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The Gentrification House

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  I believe I saw this house on social media during the pandemic. It wasn't until I was hunting boarded-up houses around Bushwick Brooklyn I came upon the 'gentrification house' by happenstance. I pulled over immediately and went to work to find the right angle. I knew it was going to be a very pleasing aesthetic composition because of the pointed contrast. When you see it it is very striking in its presence. All over the city, you see the same architectural housing popping up all with the same aesthetic without any difference in uniformity or uniqueness. Even the NYTimes did a piece on this budget constraining developer buildings across several states such as Nashville, Denver, and Seattle. Source: 1. Kodé, Anna, "America, the Bland," January 20, 2023, NYTimes

Former Bronx Gulf Center to Become MTA Electric Bus Depot

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I remember it was rather cold this day and nearly lost my fingers flying the drone around the complex. Entering the complex was rather easy since the drive-in gate was unlocked and unsecured. From the first look of it, the site was definitely an illegal dumping ground. The still-standing batting range with its intact green netting and overgrown golf hill facades stuffed with weeds. The place definitely had a family atmosphere minus the mini rainforest. The golf tee pavilion was a site to behold standing in the grass looking dead center to the structure. Beneath my feet, I could make out various colorful branded golf balls all over the ground. I eventually took a couple golf balls home as souvenirs knowing full well that next time I won't be as lucky to enter the property again. A former golf driving range shows purpose for Bronx residents to become an all-electric bus depot. The 12-acre complex (550,000 square feet) has compounded and bemused Morris Park residents since its opera

IRT (MTA) Electrical Substation No. 14 Demolished

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IRT Substation 14, one of eight original substations constructed by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company has fallen. Founded by Andrew Onderdonk and August Belmont, Jr, in 1900, The Rapid Transit Subway Construction Co. was created.  It eventually became Interborough Rapid Transit or the IRT, which constructed and created the stations, tunnels, laying tracks, manufacturing trains, and subterranean tracks. All of this would be needed to be provided with electricity to power the trains. Colossal generators had to be constructed and housed in powerhouses and substations. Substations were generally located near passenger stations which transformed the high voltage AC electricity to low voltage DC electricity from the main power plant. You can view a demonstration of this process here at MTA Substation #13 .  Photo © NYC Municipal Archives, Local History, and Genealogy. "Manhattan: West End Avenue - 96th Street (West)" Substation No.14 conveyed electrical currents from the 59th

Yellow Porsche 911 Turbo S

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CarPark X Porsche Prelaunch Event

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  GT3 Headed out to the Porsche Brooklyn prelaunch event in collaboration with CarPark . What can I say I was pretty impressed with the different range of modern colors and old-school style Porsches of different stripes and makes. So much so that I came home with a whopping 450+ images. Suffice to say you will be seeing more of me at another CarPark event in the near future.  911 Carrera 4S 911 Turbo S Porsche Ice Grey Taycan 911 Carrera 4S Porsche Taycan & 911 Carrera S Porsche GT3 RS

Former Gowanus Canal Batcave Renovated

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View from Bond Street Canal Park The infamous Brooklyn "Batcave" has been fully renovated and restored into a soon public-faceted building for downtown Brooklyn artists.  The former central Power Station of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company was decommissioned in the 1950s and was once synonymous as a temple of graffiti and a squatter community haven in the early 2000s. Hence the name "Batcave". It became so popular it even hosted concerts and underground parties as it awaited development.  The Batcave as seen from the Third Street Bridge. As Rebecca of Brownstoner states, "Brooklyn Rapid Transit acquired the property to use as a powerhouse in 1904, and “under their ownership, it appears that coal was delivered by water and transported beneath the site via coal tunnel,” the state notes. It was later owned by the Williamsburg Power Plant Corp. and then the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which used it as an electrical substation and switching yard until